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Blackpool Shirts Raise £2,120 In #BidToRemember Auction

11 March 2015

Money Raised For The Royal British Legion

Signed Blackpool shirts raised £2,120 for The Royal British Legion’s Poppy Appeal in Sky Bet’s #BidToRemember auction.

13 match-worn shirts, as well as six signed squad shirts, from Blackpool’s game at Leeds United on Saturday 8 November were auctioned through Sky Bet’s eBay site.

Fans from all over the world placed bids on the shirts, which included a limited edition poppy badge emblazoned on the chest.

The most expensive Blackpool shirt at the time was Ishmael Miller’s shirt, which fetched £210.

In total, the signed football shirts auction from all 24 Championship clubs raised £118,897.

All the money raised will be used by The Royal British Legion to provide funding for services such as the Battle Back Centre in Lilleshall, an adaptive sport and adventurous training facility for wounded, injured and sick Service personnel.

A cheque was presented to the Legion and was accepted by ex-Sapper Clive Smith – a Wolves fan – who lost both legs serving in Afghanistan in 2010. Clive spent time at the Battle Back Centre as part of his recovery in 2012.

Sky Bet’s Head of Sponsorship, Edwin Martin said: “The response to the #BidToRemember shirt auction from fans all over the world has been absolutely incredible.

“We’ve had bids from China, America and all over Europe, and the amount raised will go a long way to helping members of the Armed Forces community by funding vital facilities such as the Battle Back Centre.”

The Royal British Legion Director of Fundraising Charles Byrne said: “The money raised from the Poppy Appeal helps us to support the Armed Forces community 365 days a year.

“We support Service personnel, veterans who are transitioning back to civilian life or have left the Forces, and importantly their families too.

“Thank you to Sky Bet, The Football League, all of the participating clubs and most importantly, all of the fans who bought a shirt.”


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